Biological Treatment of Low Nutrient Wastewater Via Activated Sludge Process

Authors: Jones, Jeremy B.; Bowman, Donald

Source: Proceedings of the Water Environment Federation, Industrial Water Quality 2007 , pp. 531-537(7)

Publisher: Water Environment Federation

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Abstract:

In 1999, the US Navy began collecting and treating oily waste/waste oil (OWWO) ship discharges through a full scale activated sludge treatment plant. This highly variable wastestream has low nutrient availability, high COD values, and fluctuating salinity levels. Using sequential batch reactors with extended aeration cycles affords the operator a high degree of process control not typically found in a municipal wastewater plant. This paper describes the treatment plant process with an emphasis on the operating parameters within the plant's sequential batch reactors.

Keywords: ACTIVATED SLUDGE; OILY WASTE; SALINITY; SEQUENTIAL BATCH REACTOR; WASTE OIL

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2175/193864707787781377

Publication date: October 1, 2007

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