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Patterns of play and goals scored in international standard women's field-hockey.

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Abstract:

In this study we investigated the patterns of play resulting in goals scored in International field hockey. In total 70 women's international field hockey matches were observed. Only goals scored from open play, a total of 130, were considered in the study. Three phases of play leading up to the goal being scored were evaluated: repossession of the ball, passing into the D and the D phase. The pitch was divided into zones and specific hockey movements defined so that movement actions during each phase and time to complete each phase could be analysed. Most repossession occurred in the attacking half of the field outside the D (68%) by a free-hit (42%) or interception (38%). Goals were scored faster if the ball was repossessed in the attacking 25 yard (22.9m) area compared with the other areas of the pitch. More balls were dribbled into the D (50%) than were hit (21%), pushed (28%) or swept (1%) with more D entries from the right hand (45%) side of the pitch than the left (32%). The majority of the goals were scored from a hit (24%), deflection (25%) or push (22%) and more goals were scored from the areas nearest the goal. The results suggest that a higher proportion of goals arise from right hand offensive plays that target the bottom left hand side of the goal.

Keywords: FIELD HOCKEY; GOALS; NOTATIONAL ANALYSIS; PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2006-06-01

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