Skip to main content

The multiple myosins of malaria: The smallest malaria myosin, Plasmodium falciparum myosin-B (Pfmyo-B) is expressed in mature schizonts and merozoites

Buy Article:

$28.45 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Myosins are motor proteins which, through interaction with filamentous actin, create movement. Multiple myosins have been identified in many of the apicomplexans, however, little is known regarding provenance over the life cycle or biological function. Six Plasmodium falciparum myosins are known from studies of the genome (Pfmyo-A to Pfmyo-F). The smallest, Pfmyo-B, consists of almost only a motor ‘head’ domain, the part which generates movement; its ‘tail’, generally responsible for cargo-binding or interaction with a substrate is very limited and, similarly, there is no clear ‘neck’ region about which ‘conventional’ myosin movement occurs. Its location and function are unknown. We prepared and characterised a new anti-Pfmyo-B antibody raised against a bacterially expressed protein fragment and show on Western immunoblots that it stains a single band of the predicted size, 88kDa. Using immunofluorescence on mixed asexual stages, we show the protein is most strongly expressed in mature schizonts and merozoites. Merozoite staining lies anterior to the nucleus and varies to a degree between parasites in some showing small particulate inclusions and in others stronger more localised staining. Expression of Pfmyo-B at this developmental stage suggests that it may play a role in red cell invasion.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1078/0932-4739-00015

Affiliations: 1: Randall Centre for Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function, King's College London, New Hunt's House, Guy's Campus, London, SE1 1UL, UK;, Email: jennifer.fordham@kcl.ac.uk 2: Department of Immunobiology, School of Medicine, GKT, Guy's Campus, London, SE1 9RT, UK 3: Instituto Nacional de Salud, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Avenida Calle 26 Número 51–60, Bogotá, Colombia 4: Department of Anatomy, Cell and Human Biology, GKT, School of Biomedical Sciences, London SE1 1UL, UK 5: Randall Centre for Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function, King's College London, New Hunt's House, Guy's Campus, London, SE1 1UL, UK;, Email: jennifer.fordham@kcl.ac.uk

Publication date: 2003-12-01

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more