Comparison of living-tree and subfossil ringwidths with summer temperatures from 18th, 19th and 20th centuries in Northern Finland

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Abstract:

This work seeks to analyse the importance of summer-temperatures an the tree-ring growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) during the past three centuries. Three living-tree chronologies, subfossil pine chronology and one composite tree-ring chronology were constructed from latitudinal and altitudinal forest-limits of pine in northern Finland and compared with meteorological data comes from three localities. These data include early instrumental temperature observations from 18th and 19th centuries. The modern meteorological data covers the period from 1860 to present. Response functions were derived by means of Pearson correlations using five subperiods as follows: 1738–1748, 1802–1822, 1825–1835, 1861–1926 and 1927–1992. It was demonstrated that the correlations between ringwidths and mid-summer (July) temperatures did not vary significantly as a function of time. Early(June) and late-summer (August) mean temperatures were secondary in relation to mid-summer temperatures in controlling the radial growth. Early-summer temperatures governed pine radial growth most clearly during the 19th century, whereas late-summer temperatures had strongest influence an ring-widths during the 18th century and later part of the 20th century. There was no clear signature of temporally reduced sensitivity of Scots pine ring-widths to mid-summer temperatures over the periods of early meteorological observations. Subfossil pine chronology, constructed using pines recovered from small Jakes along the forest-limit zone, showed a consistent pattern of response to summer-temperatures in relation to living-tree chronologies.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1078/1125.7865.00049

Affiliations: 1: Department of Geology, Division of Geology and Palaeontology, University of Helsinki, FinlandPukinkuja 2 B 18, 00780 Helsinki, FinlandFinnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, Rovaniemi, FinlandA. F. loffe Physical-Technical Institute, St.-Petersburg, RussiaSaima Centre for Environmental Sciences, Savonlinna, Finland 2: Department of Geology, Division of Geology and Palaeontology, University of Helsinki, FinlandPukinkuja 2 B 18, 00780 Helsinki, FinlandFinnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, Rovaniemi, FinlandA. F. loffe Physical-Technical Institute, St.-Petersburg, RussiaSaima Centre for Environmental Sciences, Savonlinna, Finland

Publication date: July 1, 2004

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