If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Free Content Fish Population Regulation Beyond “Stock and Recruitment”: The Role of Density-Dependent Growth in the Recruited Stock

 Download
(PDF 292.7kb)
 
Download Article:

Abstract:

Most fisheries models are based on the assumption that population regulation occurs exclusively in the prerecruit phase of the life cycle, but increasing evidence indicates that density-dependent body growth in the recruited phase and its interaction with size-dependent reproductive development can play an important role in regulation. I use comparative analyses and population modeling to explore the respective roles in regulation, and the interactions between density-dependent processes in pre- and postrecruit phases of the life cycle. Of 16 study populations, 14 show significant density dependence and therefore regulation in either (9) or both (5) phases. when standardized by habitat area, the density-dependent parameters of both phases are correlated, but the density-dependent growth parameter is a better predictor of average biomass density than the equivalent parameter of the spawner-recruit relationship. Population modeling shows that, in the absence of exploitation (i.e., near carrying capacity), 11 of the 16 populations respond most strongly to relaxation of prerecruit density dependence, whereas 5 respond most strongly to relaxation of density-dependence in postrecruit growth. Growth regulation is less important when population density is reduced below carrying capacity. Fishing erodes compensatory reserve in the recruited phase by truncating the age and size distribution. The spawner-recruit relationship therefore dominates compensation in heavily exploited populations. Growth-mediated regulation in the recruited phase is likely to be important when populations are closer to carrying capacity and therefore particularly relevant to the assessment of harvest reserves, stock rebuilding measures, and fisheries enhancements.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: July 1, 2008

More about this publication?
  • The Bulletin of Marine Science is dedicated to the dissemination of high quality research from the world's oceans. All aspects of marine science are treated by the Bulletin of Marine Science, including papers in marine biology, biological oceanography, fisheries, marine affairs, applied marine physics, marine geology and geophysics, marine and atmospheric chemistry, and meteorology and physical oceanography.
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more