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Free Content Goby (Pisces: Gobiidae) interactions with meiofauna and small macrofauna

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Abstract:

Closely related gobiid fishes, Gobionellus boleosoma (Jordan and Gilbert) and G. shufeldti (Jordan and Eigenmann), were added to mesh cages to test for predatory or disturbance effects upon benthic meiofauna and small macrofauna during 40-h periods. In addition, comparisons of diet overlap were made for both goby species. Generally, diets were found to be remarkably similar for both with differences accounted for by size selectivity. Nematodes, copepods and polychaetes were the most abundant prey in goby stomachs. Effects upon infauna were density dependent with decreasing abundances for most taxa (i.e., polychaetes, copepods, nauplii, chironomids, rotifersand ostracods) with increasing numbers of gobies within 40 h. Nematode densities declined at the 0–0.5 cm sediment depth but increased at the 0.5–2.0 cm depth, perhaps as the result of downward migration by nematodes caused by goby disturbance.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: May 1, 1985

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  • The Bulletin of Marine Science is dedicated to the dissemination of high quality research from the world's oceans. All aspects of marine science are treated by the Bulletin of Marine Science, including papers in marine biology, biological oceanography, fisheries, marine affairs, applied marine physics, marine geology and geophysics, marine and atmospheric chemistry, and meteorology and physical oceanography.
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