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Faecal glucocorticoid level is not correlated with stereotypic pacing in two captive margays (Leopardus wiedii)

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Abstract:

The 'coping hypothesis' of stereotypic behaviour — that stereotypies are performed as a means of helping the animal to cope with its environment by reducing stress — was tested using two adult female margays (Leopardus wiedii), an endangered neotropical small cat species. Within-individual and between-individual comparisons of the duration of stereotypic pacing and glucocorticoid concentration, measured non-invasively in faeces, indicated that stereotypic pacing did not help the two margays to cope with their captive environment by reducing their physiological stress level. However, hiding appeared to serve as a coping function in the two margays, not by immediately reducing the faecal glucocorticoid concentration, but rather as a long-term effect.

Keywords: ANIMAL WELFARE; COPING; GLUCOCORTICOIDS; MARGAY; NON-INVASIVE; STEREOTYPIC PACING

Document Type: Short Communication

Publication date: 2005-05-01

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