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Physical Activity Related Information Sources Predict Physical Activity Behaviors in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

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Abstract:

Physical activity (PA) is a key management strategy for type 2 diabetes. Despite the known benefits, PA levels are low. Whether the low level of PA is related to lack of knowledge or support is not fully understood. This study was conducted to describe where and how often adults with type 2 diabetes receive and seek information related to PA and examine the relationships between the source and quality of PA information with PA behaviors. A series of questions related to the source and quality of PA information were added to a baseline survey distributed to the participants (N = 244) of the Canadian Aerobic and Resistance Training in Diabetes (CARED) study. Physicians and television were found to be the main sources of PA-related information. In our cross-sectional model, sources of PA-related information other than that from health care professionals explained 14% (p = .05) and 16% (p < .05) of the variance for aerobic-based and resistance training behaviors and 22% (p < .01) and 15% (p < .05) for these behaviors in our longitudinal model. Physical activity (PA)-related information is widely available to adults with type 2 diabetes. Neither the quantity nor the quality of the PA information provided by health care professionals predicted PA behavior. These data provide further insight into the modes with which PA can be promoted to adults with type 2 diabetes.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2010.522224

Affiliations: 1: Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada,Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada,School of Education, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia 2: Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 3: Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Publication date: December 1, 2010

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