Skip to main content

Potential of colour-infrared digital camera imagery for inventory and mapping of alien plant invasions in South African shrublands

Buy Article:

$60.90 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Australian Acacia plant species invade the fynbos biome of southern Africa and threaten the exceptionally high plant diversity in the Cape Floristic Region. We examine the utility of very-high spatial resolution (0.5 m) colour infrared (CIR) digital image data for discriminating Acacia species from native fynbos vegetation, other alien vegetation and bare ground. Image data were acquired at a very low cost with a single-chip, digital CIR camera mounted on a light aircraft. Shrub and tree features were uniquely identified using visual or computer-assisted interpretation. However, increases in dynamic range and accuracy of interpolation schemes for the single chip sensor will be required if semi-automatic and accurate mapping of invasive plants is to be achieved.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01431160050121384

Affiliations: 1: Department of Geography, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182 4493, USA 2: Institute for Plant Conservation, University of Cape Town, University Avenue, Rondebosch, South Africa

Publication date: October 15, 2000

More about this publication?
tandf/tres/2000/00000021/00000015/art00018
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more