TWO YEARS OF DETECTING DARK MATTER OBJECTS: THE SOLAR SYSTEM MEMBERS

Authors: DROBYSHEVSKI, E. M.; DROBYSHEVSKI, M. E.; IZMODENOVA, T. Y U.; TELNOV, D. S.

Source: Astronomical and Astrophysical Transactions, Volume 22, Number 3, June 2003 , pp. 263-271(9)

Publisher: Taylor and Francis Ltd

Buy & download fulltext article:

OR

Price: $61.16 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

With a probability greater than 99% there are grounds to believe that our works on the detection of dark electric matter objects (daemons), which were launched in 1996, are crowned with success. The daemons are the relic elementary Planckian black holes $(m \approx 30\,\rmu \hbox {g})$ carrying a stable electric charge $Z = 10e$. During the last 2 years, a detector made of two horizontal ZnS(Ag) screens of 1 m2 area has been recording the correlated time-shifted scintillations corresponding to flux $f_{\oplus}\approx 10^{-5}\,\hbox{m}^{-2}\,\hbox {s}^{-1}$ of extraordinary penetrating nuclear-active particles which moved both downwards and upwards with a velocity of only about 5-30 km s−1. The flux experiences seasonal variations with maxima supposedly corresponding to the Earth transition through the shadow and antishadow created by the Sun in its motion relative to the Galaxy disc daemon population. An accumulation of negative daemons, which stimulate the proton decay in about $1\,\rmu \hbox{s}$ inside the Earth and the Sun is capable of explaining a many facts that have previously not been understood.

Keywords: Dark matter; Dark matter in the Solar System; Elementary black holes; Planckian scale; Proton decay

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1055679031000079629

Affiliations: Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St Petersburg, Russia

Publication date: June 1, 2003

More about this publication?
Related content

Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content

Text size:

A | A | A | A
Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. print icon Print this page