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Bacterial protein meal in diets for pigs and minks: Comparative studies on protein turnover rate and urinary excretion of purine base derivatives

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Abstract:

The effect of increasing the dietary content of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on protein turnover rate, and on nucleic acid and creatinine metabolism in growing minks and pigs was investigated in two experiments. In each experiment, 16 animals were allocated to four experimental diets. The diets containing no BPM served as controls, i.e. for minks diet M1, for pigs P1; the experimental diets contained increasing levels of BPM to replace fish meal (minks) or soybean meal (pigs), so that up to 17% (P2), 20% (M2), 35% (P3), 40% (M3), 52% (P4), and 60% (M4) of digestible N was BPM derived. Protein turnover rate was measured by means of the end-product method using [15N]glycine as tracer and urinary nitrogen as end-product. In minks, protein flux, synthesis, and breakdown increased significantly with increasing dietary BPM. In pigs, diet had no observed effect on protein turnover rate. The intake of nucleic acid nitrogen (NAN) increased from 0.15 g/kg W0.75 on M1 to 0.26 g/kg W0.75 on M3 and M4 in the mink experiment, and from 0.08 g/kg W0.75 on P1 to 0.33 g/kg W0.75 on P4 in the pig experiment. Increased NAN intake led, in both experiments, to increased allantoin excretion. Analysis of species effects showed that minks excreted 1.72 mmol/kg W0.75 of allantoin, significantly more than the 0.95 mmol/kg W0.75 excreted by pigs. In minks, approximately 96% of the excreted purine base derivatives consisted of allantoin, whereas in pigs approximately 93% did. Thus, increasing the dietary content of BPM increased protein turnover rate in minks but not in pigs, and allantoin excretion increased with increasing dietary BPM although it seemed that mink decomposed purine bases to their end-product more completely than pigs did. Collectively these data show that BPM is a suitable protein source for pigs and mink, and recorded differences between species were to a large extent due to differences in protein retention capacity and muscle mass.

Keywords: Bacterial protein meal; mink; pig; protein turnover rate; purine base derivatives

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17450390701565248

Affiliations: 1: Department of Animal and Veterinary Basic Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen Denmark, 2: Department of Animal and Veterinary Basic Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen Denmark,Aquaculture Protein Centre, Centre of Excellence, Ås, Norway 3: Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås,Aquaculture Protein Centre, Centre of Excellence, Ås, Norway 4: Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås

Publication date: December 1, 2007

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