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Gelatinized Copper–Capillary Alginate Gel Functions as an Injectable Tissue Scaffolding System for Stem Cell Transplants

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Abstract:

In severe hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, cellular components such as neurons and astrocytes are injured or destroyed along with the supporting extracellular matrix. This presents a challenge to the field of regenerative medicine since the lack of extracellular matrix and supporting structures makes the transplant milieu inhospitable to the transplanted cells. A potential solution to this problem is the use of a biomaterial to provide the extracellular components needed to keep cells localized in cystic brain regions, allowing the cells to form connections and repair lost brain tissue. Ideally, this biomaterial would be combined with stem cells, which have been proven to have therapeutic potentials, and could be delivered via an injection. To study this approach, we derived a hydrogel biomaterial tissue scaffold from oligomeric gelatin and copper–capillary alginate gel (GCCAG). We then demonstrated that our multipotent astrocytic stem cells (MASCs) could be maintained in GCCAG scaffolds for up to 2 weeks in vitro and that the cells retained their multipotency. We next performed a pilot transplant study in which GCCAG was mixed with MASCs and injected into the brain of a neonatal rat pup. After a week in vivo, our results showed that: the GCCAG biomaterial did not cause a significant reactive gliosis; viable cells were retained within the injected scaffolds; and some delivered cells migrated into the surrounding brain tissue. Therefore, GCCAG tissue scaffolds are a promising, novel injectable system for transplantation of stem cells to the brain.

Keywords: ALGINATE; ANISOTROPY; BIOMATERIAL; CAPILLARY; GELATIN; IONOTROPY; STEM CELL; TISSUE ENGINEERING; TISSUE SCAFFOLD

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1163/092050610X519453

Affiliations: 1: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400, USA., Email: yoda@ufl.edu 2: McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 3: Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA 4: Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 5: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400, USA; J. Crayton Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 6: Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 7: McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Publication date: 2011-05-01

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