If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

The Darwinian dilemma of the first species and the principle of pseudo-monophyly of Phanerozoic diversity

$39.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

In his publications, Darwin avoided the discussion of the evolutionary origin of the mechanisms of life. His principle of the Unity of Type states that every taxonomic group of the Phanerozoic is built according to its own unique bauplan and is hence derived from one single ancestor. This leads to the inevitable conclusion that the diversity of the Phanerozoic dates back to a single progenitor species. However, according to the laws of ecology a single plant or animal species could not survive. Hence, Darwin stated that life on Earth started with about 10 first plant and animal species, which is in accordance with the ecological laws. Most of the descendants of most of the first species died out, whereas the remaining ones underwent convergent evolution which led to the unity of type ("pseudo-monophyly"), and divergent evolution which led to the enormous Phanerozoic diversity on the species and on the ecosystem level. Woese's (2002) model of the "Darwinian Threshold" provides a modern mechanism of Darwin's "pseudo-monophyly", especially of the almost-universality of metabolic mechanisms and genetic code, of the several or many species at the root of the phylogenetic tree, and of the early extinction of other early species.

Keywords: BAUPLANE; HORIZONTAL GENE TRANSFER; ORIGIN OF LIFE; PHYLOGENY; TREE OF LIFE

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1127/0077-7749/2007/0244-0371

Publication date: June 1, 2007

More about this publication?
  • Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie continuously publishes current original contributions from all fields of geology, ever since its foundation in 1807. All published contributions are in the English language.
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more