MOTIVE, ROLE IDENTITY, AND PROSOCIAL PERSONALITY AS PREDICTORS OF VOLUNTEER ACTIVITY

Authors: Finkelstein, Marcia A.; Penner, Louis A.; Brannick, Michael T.

Source: Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, Volume 33, Number 4, 2005 , pp. 403-418(16)

Publisher: Scientific Journal Publishers

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Abstract:

Constructs from the functional analysis and role identity models of volunteerism were combined in a study of activity and tenure among hospice volunteers. The influence of prosocial personality tendencies on sustained volunteer activity was also examined. The findings were most supportive of a role identity model of sustained volunteerism. Identity and perceived expectations emerged as the strongest predictors of both time spent volunteering and length of service. Initial motives for volunteering showed a weaker than expected relationship with volunteerism. Motives were, however, correlated with role identity and perceived expectations in an interpretable and theoretically coherent manner. The results provided preliminary support for a conceptual framework that integrates the functional and identity approaches to understanding long-term volunteers.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2005.33.4.403

Publication date: January 1, 2005

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