MODELING EFFECTS IN STUDENT DRINKING AND SMOKING, REVISITED AFTER 24 YEARS

$39.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

A systematic replication is reported of a campus survey carried out in 1978. The present data (N = 100) indicate increased peer modeling effects for drinking, in which a respondent's intake of alcohol and drunkenness are both best predicted from the drinking of his/her friends. Smoking, however, today shows no correlation with the smoking of either friends or parents, unlike the previous survey. Alcohol consumption, measured as drinks per week, has remained constant over 24 years for female students, but has doubled for males, reaching four times the female level. The frequency of drinking “to excess” also increased greatly over this interval. Smoking has decreased to minimal levels, and now shows no sign of modeling effects, but self-serving bias now occurs, since respondents today report themselves as smoking fewer cigarettes than their friends.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2224/sbp.2002.30.5.435

Publication date: January 1, 2002

More about this publication?
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more