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THE EFFECTS OF FALSE PHYSIOLOGICAL FEEDBACK AND SUBJECT RELEVANCE UPON BELIEF ACCEPTANCE

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Abstract:

A conceptual replication and extension of Giesen and Hendrick's (1974) false physiological feedback experiment was performed. Bogus heart rate of different intensities as well as meter feedback indicative of affective types of arousal was presented to smokers and nonsmokers as they viewed an anti-smoking communication. Consistent with Giesen and Hendrick's intensity hypothesis, intensity feedback facilitated message acceptance while the type of feedback had no effect, but for nonsmokers only. This suggests that false feedback facilitates persuasion only for topics which subjects do not find directly relevant or of personal concern. For smokers, the false feedback appeared to inhibit persuasion, suggesting a resistance effect. The attributional significance of false physiological feedback is discussed.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.2224/sbp.1982.10.2.213

Publication date: 1982-01-01

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