Skip to main content

GAZE AND DISTANCE AS A FUNCTION OF CHANGES IN INTERPERSONAL GAZE

Buy Article:

$39.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Subjects were exposed to one of two patterns of confederate gaze: either he gazed at, then away from their eyes, or he gazed away, then at their eyes. The subjects' distance was unaffected by the gaze pattern, and they visually reciprocated the confederate's gaze direction. The results are in-terpreted as failing to support Argyle and Dean's compensation hypothesis. Also, amount of gaze decreased with time, and, relative to males, females gazed more and were more responsive to changes in the confederate's gaze direction.
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 1977-01-01

More about this publication?
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more