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THE EFFECT OF ROLE-TAKING TRAINING ON ROLE-TAKING AND SOCIAL BEHAVIORS IN YOUNG CHILDREN

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The hypotheses of this study were that role-taking training would increase (1) role-taking skills and (2) relative amount of peer interaction as compared with adult interaction. Forty-two pre-school children were subjects, selected on the basis of egocentric scores on a battery of two spatial role-taking and two conceptual role-taking tasks. Subjects were assigned to experimental, placebo, and non-treatment control groups. Experimental and placebo subjects were observed for social interactions. Experimental intervention was a 2-month program of 24 training lessons. Placebo subjects participated in story groups. Results were that experimental subjects increased significantly in spatial role-taking only, although changes in conceptual scores were in the predicted direction. Trend level differences in the predicted direction were found for measures of relative preference for peer interaction.
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Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 1977-01-01

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