Probe-Dependent Microenvironments Within Biodegradable Films Formed from Poly(L-Lactic Acid) and Pluronic 104

$29.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

We report on the local microenvironment surrounding three small fluorescent probe molecules (pyrene, [6-propionyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino) naphthalene] (PRODAN), and [4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran] (DCM)) when they are sequestered at low concentration within thin biodegradable films formed from poly( L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and Pluronic P104 blends. Despite each probe molecule being neutral, they sense and report from much different microenvironments in comparison to each other. Specifically, the non-polar pyrene probe senses a slightly more polar microenvironment as the PLLA content in the polymer blend increases. In contrast, the polar PRODAN and DCM probes sense less polar microenvironments as the PLLA content within the polymer blend increases. Time-resolved fluorescence intensity decay experiments on pure PLLA films reveal that each probe molecule encounters significant heterogeneity. Pyrene emits simultaneously from three discrete microenvironments. This is consistent with pyrene molecules reporting from crystalline, amorphous-crystalline intermediate, and amorphous regions. PRODAN and DCM appear to emit from a continuum of microenvironments. These results have ramifications on the performance of biodegradable drug delivery platforms loaded with small drug molecules.

Keywords: BIODEGRADABLE POLYMERS; FLUORESCENCE; PLURONIC P104; POLY(L-LACTIC ACID)

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1366/000370210791114266

Affiliations: 1: Department of Chemistry, 85 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623-5603 2: Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division Code Q22, Dahlgren, Virginia 22448-5160 3: Department of Chemistry, Natural Sciences Complex, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 4: Department of Chemistry, Natural Sciences Complex, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000; Email: chefvb@buffalo.edu

Publication date: April 1, 2010

More about this publication?
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more