Near-Infrared Analysis of Ground Barley for Use as a Feedstock for Fuel Ethanol Production

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Abstract:

The objective of this study was to explore the potential of near-infrared spectroscopy for determining the compositional quality properties of barley as a feedstock for fuel ethanol production and to compare the prediction accuracy between calibration models obtained using a Fourier transform near-infrared system (FT-NIR) and a dispersive near-infrared system. The total sample set contained 206 samples of three types of barley, hull-less, malt, and hulled varieties, which were grown at various locations in the eastern U.S. from 2002 to 2005 years. A new hull-less barley variety, Doyce, which was specially bred for potential use in ethanol production, was included in the sample set. One hundred and thirty-eight barley samples were used for calibration and sixty-eight were used for validation. Ground barley samples were scanned on both a FTNIR spectrometer (10 000 to 4000 cm−1 at 4 cm−1 resolution) and a dispersive NIR spectrometer (400 to 2498 nm at 10 nm resolution), respectively. Six grain components, moisture, starch, β-glucan, protein, oil, and ash content, were analyzed as parameters of barley quality. Principal component analysis showed that barley samples could be classified by their types: hull-less, malt, and hulled. Partial least squares regression indicated that both FT-NIR and dispersive NIR spectroscopy have the potential to determine quality properties of barley with an acceptable accuracy, except for β-glucan content. There was no predictive advantage in using a high-resolution FT-NIR instrument over a dispersive system for most components of barley.

Keywords: BARLEY; DISPERSIVE SPECTROSCOPY; FOURIER TRANSFORM NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY; FT-NIR SPECTROSCOPY; FUEL ETHANOL; NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY; NIRS; PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES; PLS REGRESSION

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1366/000370207782597148

Affiliations: 1: Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, ARS, USDA, P.O. Box 5677, Athens, Georgia 30605 2: Dept. of Crop & Soil Env. Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 3: Eastern Regional Research Center, ARS, USDA, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania 19038

Publication date: November 1, 2007

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