Characterization and Optimization of a Direct Injection Nebulizer for Introduction of Organic Solvents and Volatile Analyte Species into an Inductively Coupled Plasma

Authors: Avery, Thomas W.1; Chakrabarty, Chitra2; Thompson, Joseph J.3

Source: Applied Spectroscopy, Volume 44, Issue 10, Pages 1595-1722 (December 1990) , pp. 1690-1698(9)

Publisher: Society for Applied Spectroscopy

Buy & download fulltext article:

OR

Price: $29.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) is evaluated as a means of introducing organic solvents and volatile analyte species into an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The DIN used in this work differs in several important aspects from a commercially available DIN, after which it is patterned. When used for flow injection analysis, the DIN exhibits a long-term precision of about 4% RSD while nebulizing pure organic solvents. Under normal operating conditions, detection limits are generally an order of magnitude worse in organic solvents than in water, but they can usually be improved by using higher forward powers and viewing higher in the plasma. Measurements of the atom/ion line intensity ratios of copper under various conditions indicate that a large but nearly constant degree of plasma cooling exists when organic solvents are nebulized. When compared to a Meinhard nebulizer-ICP system, the DIN-ICP system gives more uniform response towards different chemical species of the same element, even when great differences in volatility exist between the species.

Keywords: Direct injection nebulizer; Inductively coupled plasma; Sample introduction

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1366/0003702904417535

Affiliations: 1: Department of Chemistry, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306; present address: Upjohn Company, 4921 Bldg. 41 Stop 17, 7000 Portage Road, Kalamazoo, MI 49001 2: Department of Chemistry, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306; present address: Department of Biochemistry, Indiana University School of Medicine, 635 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46223 3: Department of Chemistry, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306; present address: Ross Laboratories, 625 Cleveland Ave., 54, Columbus, OH 43215

Publication date: December 1, 1990

More about this publication?
Related content

Tools

Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content

Text size:

A | A | A | A
Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. print icon Print this page