Infrared Spectra of Diethylenetriamine and 2-(2-Aminoethylamino)ethanol

Authors: Segal, Leon; Eggerton, F. V.

Source: Applied Spectroscopy, Volume 15, Issue 5, Pages 121-155 (September 1961) , pp. 148-150(3)

Publisher: Society for Applied Spectroscopy

Buy & download fulltext article:

OR

Price: $29.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

The formation of a coordination compound between diethylenetriamine (DETA) and cellulose has been reported by Segal and Loeb (4), and studies have been planned for elucidating the structure and mode of bonding of the complex. X-ray diffraction studies (4) indicate that the DETA-cellulose complex, and the complex formed between ethylenediamine (EDA) and cellulose have very similar crystalline interplanar dimensions. Segal and Loeb concluded that the DETA molecule was bonded to the cellulose chain molecules in a manner similar to that accepted for the EDA molecule, this being possible because of a similarity in amine structures. To further pursue the structure study on the complex, another compound, 2-(2-aminoethylamino) ethanol (AEAE), was selected for its structural relationship to DETA and EDA. Infrared spectroscopy was considered to be the best way of obtaining the data needed for elucidating the manner of bonding. However, the study was hampered by lack of information on the infrared spectra of the above amine compounds. In this note the infrared spectra of the amine compounds are presented, and assignments of the observed bands to structural units in the molecule are made.

Document Type: Short Communication

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1366/000370261774426902

Affiliations: Southern Regional Research Laboratory, New Orleans, La

Publication date: September 1, 1961

More about this publication?
Related content

Tools

Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content

Text size:

A | A | A | A
Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. print icon Print this page