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Eucalyptus for Low Elevation Foothill Plantations in California

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Abstract:

In March 1984 we established a test plantation of selected Eucalyptus and poplar seedlings species and clones on a range site in the Sierra Nevada foothills. The main objectives were to evaluate survival and growth of the various species and clones and to determine a rotation age for intensively managed hardwood trees grown under low elevation foothill conditions. Seedlings and clones of six species of Eucalyptus and one hybrid poplar were grown with short rotation intensive culture techniques for 7 yr. Rotation age, defined as the culmination of mean annual increment, varied from 3 to 6 yr. The best producing clone produced 8 cords of fuelwood per acre per year. The potential for damage from freezing and snow at these elevations is also discussed. West. J. Appl. For. 12(4):104-107.

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: Dept. of Environmental Horticulture, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8587

Publication date: 1997-10-01

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  • Each regional journal of applied forestry focuses on research, practice, and techniques targeted to foresters and allied professionals in specific regions of the United States and Canada. The Western Journal of Applied Forestry covers the western United States, including Alaska, and western Canada; WJAF will also consider manuscripts reporting research in northern Mexico that has potential application in the southwestern United States.
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