Organic Debris and the Management of Small Stream Channels

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Abstract:

Longitudinal profiles, riparian and in-channel debris loads, and sediment storage were measured in eight reaches of first- to third-order, snowmelt-dominated, intermittent, and perennial streams in western Montana. Low-order channels tended to concentrate debris. Organic matter provided over 60% of total sediment storage in all study reaches. We suggest that Streamside Management Zones (SMZs) be extended to include intermittent channels and possibly the lowest portions of ephemeral channels in anticipation of their activation. Predisturbance appraisal of downed woody fuels in these SMZs is recommended to provide a target debris loading during site preparation, thus ensuring a steady-state supply of organic materials to maintain channel stabdity following timber harvest. West. J. Appl. For. 5(1):25-28.

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: School of Forestry, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812

Publication date: January 1, 1990

More about this publication?
  • Each regional journal of applied forestry focuses on research, practice, and techniques targeted to foresters and allied professionals in specific regions of the United States and Canada. The Western Journal of Applied Forestry covers the western United States, including Alaska, and western Canada; WJAF will also consider manuscripts reporting research in northern Mexico that has potential application in the southwestern United States.
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