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Regional Differences among Family Forest Landowners Using National Woodland Owner Survey Results

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Abstract:

Family forest landowners have traditionally been considered fairly homogeneous. A number of new studies in the past decade, however, have demonstrated that landowners and their reasons for owning forestland differ substantially. These landowners own approximately 35% of our nation's forestland, and they warrant further research concerning these differences. So far, there has been no substantial examination of regional differences among family forest owners considering landowner characteristics. Individuals own land for a variety of reasons (aesthetics, income, etc.), and many external considerations may affect how they manage (such as proximity to neighboring lands and mimicking neighboring land management regimes). National Woodland Owner Survey results are used along with previously assigned motivation clusters regarding why family forest owners own their woodland in this article. This study examined landowner characteristics along with the existing literature and attempted to weave an explanation regarding regional differences among family forest owners. Results indicate that there are differences among family forest owners from region to region, and these can be explained in the context of the literature. The results could be useful in the future as resource professionals attempt to target appropriate information to landowners concerning sustainable forest management.

Keywords: National Woodland Owner Survey; nonindustrial private forest landowners

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5849/sjaf.11-007

Publication date: 2012-08-01

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  • Each regional journal of applied forestry focuses on research, practice, and techniques targeted to foresters and allied professionals in specific regions of the United States and Canada. The Southern Journal of Applied Forestry covers an area from Virginia and Kentucky south to as far west as Oklahoma and east Texas.
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