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Systemic Insecticide Injections for Control of Cone and Seed Insects in Loblolly Pine Seed Orchards—2 Year Results

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Abstract:

Three systemic insecticide treatments, emamectin benzoate alone, imidacloprid alone, and a combination of emamectin benzoate and thiamethoxam, were injected one or two times into loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., during a 2 yr period in a seed orchard in east Texas. Single injections of treatments containing emamectin benzoate reduced coneworm (Dioryctria spp.) damage by 94–97% during the study period. A second injection after 1 yr did not improve protection. Imidacloprid also significantly reduced coneworm damage in 1999, but not in 2000. Significant reductions in damage from pine seed bugs (Tetyra bipunctata Say and Leptoglossus corculus Herrich-Schaffer) and an increase in the number of full seeds per cone resulted from imidacloprid and thiamethoxam treatments and to a lesser extent from emamectin benzoate. Yearly injections of imidacloprid or thiamethoxam were required to maintain protection against seed bugs. The best overall treatment, two injections of emamectin benzoate plus thiamethoxam, reduced cone and seed losses from insects by 86%. South. J. Appl. For. 26(3):146–152.

Keywords: Tree injection; coneworm; environmental management; forest; forest management; forest resources; forestry; forestry research; forestry science; loblolly pine seed orchard; natural resource management; natural resources; seed bug

Document Type: Miscellaneous

Affiliations: Forest Pest Management, Texas Forest Service, P.O. Box 310 Lufkin, Texas, 75902-0310,

Publication date: August 1, 2002

More about this publication?
  • Each regional journal of applied forestry focuses on research, practice, and techniques targeted to foresters and allied professionals in specific regions of the United States and Canada. The Southern Journal of Applied Forestry covers an area from Virginia and Kentucky south to as far west as Oklahoma and east Texas.
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