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Southern Pine Beetle Impacts and Control Policy in the 1982-1986 Texas Epidemic

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Abstract:

The 1985 southern pine beetle (SPB) epidemic in Texas was the worst in the state's history, resulting in a loss of almost 810 million board feet (mmbf) of timber. National forestlands experienced five times more damage per acre than private lands in 1985. The Sam Houston National Forest and three units of the Big Thicket National Preserve were worst hit, with almost 16 and 10 SPB spots per 1,000 ac, respectively. Private lands located near public lands experienced higher SPB spot densities than on other private lands. Examination of factors influencing SPB outbreak intensity--including stand structure, direct SPB control measures, and the overall aggressiveness of pest control management--suggest early and aggressive mechanical control on public lands to minimize losses on nearby private lands as a short-term strategy. Further suggestions include spatial considerations in hazard rating systems. South. J. Appl. For. 15(3):145-153.

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: Department of Forest Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843

Publication date: August 1, 1991

More about this publication?
  • Each regional journal of applied forestry focuses on research, practice, and techniques targeted to foresters and allied professionals in specific regions of the United States and Canada. The Southern Journal of Applied Forestry covers an area from Virginia and Kentucky south to as far west as Oklahoma and east Texas.
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