Skip to main content

Survival and Growth of Planted Hardwoods in Harvested Openings with First-Order Lateral Root Differences, Root-Dipping, and Tree Shelters

Buy Article:

$29.50 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

Survival and height of four hardwood species--black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), white oak (Q. alba L.), and black oak (Q. velutina Lam.)--were evaluated 4 yr after the trees were outplanted in a recently harvested hardwood site. The study evaluated the influence of numbers of first-order lateral roots (FOLR); preplanting-root treatments (RT) that included both separate and combination treatments of a biostimulant, Roots®, a moisture loss retardant, SuperSorb-F® (SS), and a water control; and tree shelters (TS) on seedling performance. Except for black walnut, 4 yr survival was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher with tree shelters than without them. However, survival was not affected by FOLR or RT. The number of FOLR significantly affected the 4 yr height growth of northern red oak and black oak, but they did not affect the height growth of black walnut and white oak. Four-year height growth for black walnut and northern red oak was greater for unsheltered trees than for sheltered trees; the reverse was true for white oak and black oak. First-order lateral roots, root collar diameter (RCD), and TS were significantly correlated with first-year height and/or 4 yr height growth. Root treatments did not affect height growth. The overall good survival and limited treatment effect indicate that the number of FOLR was of limited importance on this site for these tree species. However, treatment effects may have been different on a more stressful site. North. J. Appl. For. 17(2):45-50.

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station, 208 Foster Hall, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO 65102, (573) 681-5575;, Fax: (573) 681-5579

Publication date: 2000-06-01

More about this publication?
  • Each regional journal of applied forestry focuses on research, practice, and techniques targeted to foresters and allied professionals in specific regions of the United States and Canada. The Northern Journal of Applied Forestry covers northeastern, midwestern, and boreal forests in the United States and Canada.
  • Membership Information
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more