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Association of an Insect-Fungal Complex with Red Pine Decline in Wisconsin

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Abstract:

Red pine decline, characterized by an expanding circular area of dead and declining trees, is becoming increasingly prevalent in Lake States plantations. A 3-year study was conducted to determine whether any insects, fungi, and/or soil parameters were associated with this syndrome. The root collar weevil--Hylobius radicis, the pales weevil--Hylobius pales, the pitch-eating weevil Pachylobius picivorus, the red turpentine beetle--Dendroctonus valens and Hylastes porculus were significantly more abundant in declining stands than in healthy Pinus resinosa stands. These root- and lower stem-infesting insects consistently carried Leptographium terebrantis and Leptographium procerum. Higher soil organic matter, pH and K levels were also associated with areas of mortality. Intensive root sampling revealed high levels of root mortality, staining, infestation with Leptographium species and extensively grafted root systems in declining red pine stands. This advancing belowgound mortality precedes the aboveground symptoms of reduced radial growth, thin crown structure, and infestation by the pine engraver, Ips pini, and its fungal associate Ophiostoma ips. Colonization by the latter two species is always associated with and/or responsible for ultimate tree death. A sequence of interactions among this complex of organisms and abiotic factors is proposed as the cause of red pine decline. For. Sci. 37(4):1119-1139.

Keywords: Bark beetles; forest decline; root disease; root graft; root weevils

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin--Madison

Publication date: 1991-09-01

More about this publication?
  • Forest Science is a peer-reviewed journal publishing fundamental and applied research that explores all aspects of natural and social sciences as they apply to the function and management of the forested ecosystems of the world. Topics include silviculture, forest management, biometrics, economics, entomology & pathology, fire & fuels management, forest ecology, genetics & tree improvement, geospatial technologies, harvesting & utilization, landscape ecology, operations research, forest policy, physiology, recreation, social sciences, soils & hydrology, and wildlife management.
    Forest Science is published bimonthly in February, April, June, August, October, and December.

    2015 Impact Factor: 1.702
    Ranking: 16 of 66 in forestry

    Average time from submission to first decision: 62.5 days*
    June 1, 2016 to Feb. 28, 2017

    Also published by SAF:
    Journal of Forestry
    Other SAF Publications
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