Phosphorus Uptake Capacity of 14-Year-Old Loblolly Pine as Indicated by a 32P Root Bioassay

Authors: Pennell, Kurt D.; Allen, Lee H.; Jackson, William A.

Source: Forest Science, Volume 36, Number 2, 1 June 1990 , pp. 358-366(9)

Publisher: Society of American Foresters

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Abstract:

Excised loblolly pine roots were exposed to a 32p-labelled solution for 20 minutes to measure their capacity for P uptake. On five dates from March 1985 to March 1986, root samples were collected from 14-year-old loblolly pine which had received 101 kg P · ha-1 and 0 kg P · ha-1 when they were planted. Phosphorus uptake by roots of nonfertilized loblolly pine (1.10 mol P · g-1 · hr-1) was significantly greater than that by roots of fertilized loblolly pine (0.72 mol P · g-1 · hr-1) when sampled between June and October, but no difference was detected when sampled in March. Phosphorus uptake was decreased by approximately 50% at 7°C compared to 25°C, and in the presence of metabolic inhibitors. Phosphorus concentrations, measured after the bioassay, of roots from fertilized trees (0.93 g P · kg-1) were significantly greater than those of roots from nonfertilized trees (0.45 g P · kg-1) on all five sampling dates. Capacity for root P uptake did not have an advantage over root or foliar P concentrations as an indicator of P stress, and does not appear to be a practical diagnostic tool for semimature loblolly pine. For. Sci. 36(2):358-366.

Keywords: Forest fertilization; nutrient concentration; phosphorus uptake

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: Professor, Soil Science Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695

Publication date: June 1, 1990

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  • Forest Science is a peer-reviewed journal publishing fundamental and applied research that explores all aspects of natural and social sciences as they apply to the function and management of the forested ecosystems of the world. Topics include silviculture, forest management, biometrics, economics, entomology & pathology, fire & fuels management, forest ecology, genetics & tree improvement, geospatial technologies, harvesting & utilization, landscape ecology, operations research, forest policy, physiology, recreation, social sciences, soils & hydrology, and wildlife management.
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