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Martin Buber's philosophy of education and its implications for adult non-formal education

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Abstract:

The Jewish philosopher and educator Martin Buber (1878-1965) is considered one of the twentieth century's greatest contributors to the philosophy of religion and is also recognized as the pre-eminent scholar of Hasidism. He has also attracted considerable attention as a philosopher of education. However, most commentaries on this aspect of his work have focussed on the implications of his philosophy for formal education and for the education of the child. Given that much of Buber's philosophy is based on dialogue, on community and on mutuality, it is puzzling that relatively little has been written on the implications of Buber's thought for the theory and practice of non-formal adult education. The article provides a discussion of the philosophy underpinning this aspect of Martin Buber's life and work, and its implications for adult non-formal education.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/02601370903189989

Affiliations: 1: University of Durham, UK 2: University of Nottingham, UK

Publication date: 2009-09-01

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