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The effects of student verbal and nonverbal responsiveness on teacher self-efficacy and job satisfaction

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Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of student verbal and nonverbal responsiveness on teacher self-efficacy and job satisfaction. Over a quarter (26%) of the total variance in teacher self-efficacy and over half (53%) of the total variance in teacher job satisfaction were attributable to student verbal and nonverbal responsiveness. Rather than student verbal and nonverbal responsiveness interacting, the analyses of variance yielded significant main effects for both the verbal responsiveness and nonverbal responsiveness independent variables on each of the teacher self-efficacy and job satisfaction dependent variables. Overall, student nonverbal responsiveness had a greater effect on teacher self-efficacy and job satisfaction than verbal responsiveness. Also, teacher job satisfaction was more susceptible to student verbal and nonverbal responsiveness than teacher self-efficacy. Limitations and implications are reviewed.

Keywords: student nonverbal responsiveness; student verbal responsiveness; teacher needs; teacher self-efficacy; teaching satisfaction

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03634520410001682410

Publication date: April 1, 2004

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