Skip to main content

Is there gender discrimination in named professorships? An econometric analysis of economics departments in the US South

Buy Article:

$51.63 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

This study examines the correlates of the probability that an individual academician holds a named professorship. Named professorships, like other positions within an organization, are determined by a mixture of market and non-market forces. Thus, both merit (both past and expected future productivity) and discrimination may play a role. Regression results and Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition tests presented here support a conclusion of gender discrimination in the named professorship process at American institutions of higher education. Specifically, it is found that gender discrimination results in a 7.6 percentage point disadvantage for females (relative to males) regarding the likelihood of holding a named professorship in economics.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00036840500048902

Affiliations: 1: Department of Economics and International Business, The University of Southern Mississippi, USA 2: Department of Operations and Management, Washington State University, USA

Publication date: May 10, 2005

More about this publication?
routledg/raef/2005/00000037/00000008/art00001
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more