The 'Home Grown' Presidency: empirical evidence on localism in presidential voting, 1972-2000

Authors: Mixon, Franklin G.; Tyrone, J. Matthew

Source: Applied Economics, Volume 36, Number 16, September 10, 2004 , pp. 1745-1749(5)

Publisher: Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group

Buy & download fulltext article:

OR

Price: $54.28 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Abstract:

This builds upon the conceptual framework of Lewis-Beck and Rice (American Journal of Political Science, 27, 548-56, 1983), in combination with the empirical design of Kjar and Laband (Public Choice, 112, 143-50, 2002), to investigate home grown-ness in US presidential elections from 1972-2000. It found that, ceteris paribus, home state vote shares for US Presidential election winners are 5.19-15.11 percentage points higher due to the home grown-ness effect. In the eight presidential elections analysed, this study confirms two aspects of prior work. First, the estimate of a home grown-ness effect in presidential elections of 5.19 percentage points (on average), supports the 4 percentage point average found by Lewis-Beck and Rice (1983). Second, that support for the winning president monotonically increases as moves are made away from the opponent's home territory confirms the cascading dummy variable series approach developed by Kjar and Laband (2002).

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0003684042000227886

Publication date: September 1, 2004

More about this publication?
Related content

Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content

Text size:

A | A | A | A
Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. print icon Print this page