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The determinants and labour market effects of lifelong learning

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Despite the policy importance of lifelong learning, there is very little hard evidence from the UK on (a) who undertakes lifelong learning and why, and (b) the economic benefits of lifelong learning. This paper uses a rich longitudinal panel data set to look at key factors that determine whether someone undertakes lifelong learning and then models the effect of the different qualifications acquired via lifelong learning on individuals' economic outcomes, namely wages and the likelihood of being employed. Those who left school with O-level qualifications or above were much more likely to undertake lifelong learning. Undertaking one episode of lifelong learning also increased the probability of undertaking more lifelong learning. We found little evidence of positive wage effects from lifelong learning. However, males who left school with only low-level qualifications do earn substantially more if they undertake a degree via lifelong learning. We also found important positive employment effects from lifelong learning.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL 2: King's College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS 3: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London, WC2A 2AE

Publication date: 2003-11-10

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