Motion illusion reveals fixation stability of karate athletes

Authors: Seya, Yasuhiro1; Mori, Shuji2

Source: Visual Cognition, Volume 15, Number 4, May 2007 , pp. 491-512(22)

Publisher: Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group

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Abstract:

To investigate the effect of smooth pursuit effort against optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) on the magnitude of induced motion, we measured the magnitude of induced motion and eye movements of karate athletes and novices. In Experiment 1, participants were required to pursue a horizontally moving fixation stimulus against a vertically moving inducing stimulus and to point at the most distorted position of the perceived pathway of the fixation stimulus. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants were presented with the inducing stimulus with or without a static fixation stimulus. Experiments 1 and 2 showed a larger magnitude of induced motion and more stable fixation for the athletes than for the novices. Experiment 3 showed no difference in eye movements between the two groups. These results suggest that the magnitude of induced motion reflects fixation stability that may have been strengthened in karate athletes through their experience and training.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13506280600777718

Affiliations: 1: Department of Kinesiology, Graduate School of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan 2: Cognitive Science Division, Department of Intelligent Systems, Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Japan

Publication date: May 1, 2007

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