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‘A slow industrial genocide’: tar sands and the indigenous peoples of northern Alberta

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Abstract:

In this article we discuss the impact of the tar sands development in northern Alberta on the indigenous communities of the Treaty 8 region. While the project has brought income to some, and wealth to the few, its impact on the environment and on the lives of many indigenous groups is profoundly concerning. Their ability to hunt, trap and fish has been severely curtailed and, where it is possible, people are often too fearful of toxins to drink water and eat fish from waterways polluted by the ‘externalities’ of tar sands production. The situation has led some indigenous spokespersons to talk in terms of a slow industrial genocide being perpetrated against them. We begin the article with a discussion of the treaty negotiations which paved the way for tar sands development before moving on to discuss the impacts of modern day tar sands extraction and the applicability of the genocide concept.

Keywords: extreme energy; genocide; indigenous peoples; tar sands

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/13642987.2011.649593

Publication date: 2012-01-01

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