New Zealand's Economic Reforms: an assessment

Author: Dalziel, Paul

Source: Review of Political Economy, Volume 14, Number 1, 1 January 2002 , pp. 31-46(16)

Publisher: Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group

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Abstract:

New Zealand's economic policy between 1984 and 1996 is often hailed as an example of comprehensive supply-side reform that successfully improved the performance of a weak economy. In contrast, this paper presents statistical evidence to show that: (1) New Zealand sacrificed a large volume of real per capita gross domestic product after 1987; (2) its average unemployment rate increased substantially after 1988; (3) labour productivity growth declined after 1992; and (4) the per capita real income of low-income households in 1996 was more than 3% lower in absolute terms than it had been in 1984. The paper concludes that the economic reform programme did not achieve the objectives expected at its launch.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09538250120102750

Publication date: January 1, 2002

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