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Semantic effects in word naming: Evidence from English and Japanese Kanji

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Abstract:

Three experiments investigated whether reading aloud is affected by a semantic variable, imageability. The first two experiments used English, and the third experiment used Japanese Kanji as a way of testing the generality of the findings across orthographies. The results replicated the earlier findings that readers were slower and more error prone in reading low-frequency exception words when they were low in imageability than when they were high in imageability (Strain, Patterson, & Seidenberg, 1995). This result held for both English and Kanji even when age of acquisition was taken into account as a possible confounding variable, and the imageability effect was stronger in Kanji compared to English.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02724980244000369

Affiliations: 1: University College London, London, UK 2: Otemon Gakuin University, Osaka, Japan 3: University of Padova, Padova, Italy 4: Middlesex University, London, UK 5: Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK

Publication date: January 1, 2003

psych/pqja/2003/00000056/00000002/art00004
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