Memory discrimination for self-performed and imagined acts: Bizarreness effects in false recognition

Authors: Worthen, James B.; Wood, Virginia V.

Source: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A, 1 February 2001, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 49-67(19)

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Abstract:

Two experiments investigated the susceptibility of common and unusual action events to memory distortion under incidental learning and delayed testing conditions. Experiment 1 tested the influence of imaginal and enactment instructions at testing on memory discrimination for self-performed and imagined acts. The influence of hypnotic procedures at testing on memory discrimination for action events was tested in Experiment 2. The results of both experiments suggest that the likelihood of confusing details associated with separate, previously experienced unusual action events is greater than the likelihood of confusing details associated with separate, previously experienced common action events. Based on the results of both experiments, it is concluded that bizarreness has both memory-facilitating and memory-inhibiting qualities.

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02724980042000020

Affiliations: University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, U.S.A.

Publication date: February 1, 2001

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