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College Students' Polytobacco Use, Cigarette Cessation, and Dependence

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Objectives: We examined patterns of tobacco and electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among college students. Differences in sociodemographic characteristics between non-users of these products and 4 mutually exclusive groups of tobacco/e-cigarette users were assessed. Differences in cigarette cessation attempts and dependence between exclusive cigarette smokers and users of cigarettes and at least one alternative tobacco product also were examined. Methods: Participants were 5468 18-29 year-old students from 24 colleges in Texas who completed an online survey. Results: Multiple-product use was more prevalent than single-product use. All 4 current tobacco/e-cigarette-user groups were more likely than non-users to be men and older. College students who were younger when they smoked their first cigarette, and those reporting ever needing a cigarette, were more likely to be multiple-product users than cigarette-only users. There were no group differences in cigarette cessation attempts or any other variables. Conclusions: Using multiple products is associated with some indicators of dependence, but does not seem to aid or deter college students' smoking cessation attempts. Longitudinal research is needed given that transitions in tobacco/e-cigarette use continue throughout young adulthood.
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Keywords: CIGARETTE CESSATION ATTEMPTS; CIGARETTE DEPENDENCE; NON-CIGARETTE PRODUCTS; POLYTOBACCO USE; TOBACCO USE AMONG YOUNG ADULTS

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Kinesiology & Health Education, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA. [email protected] 2: Department of Kinesiology & Health Education, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA 3: Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, UT Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus, Austin, TX, USA 4: Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, UT Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus, Austin, TX, USA

Publication date: 2016-07-01

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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