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Depressive Symptoms Among Immigrant Latino Sexual Minorities

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Objective: To estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of depressive symptoms among immigrant Latino sexual minorities. Methods: Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms, and univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify correlates of depressive symptoms. Results: Unweighted and RDS-weighted prevalence estimates of depressive symptoms were 69.2% and 74.8%, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, low social support, sexual compulsivity, and high self-esteem were significantly associated with increased depressive symptoms. Conclusions: A need exists for culturally congruent mental health services for immigrant Latino sexual minorities in the southern United States.
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Keywords: CBPR; COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH; DEPRESSION; GAY; HISPANIC; HOMOPHOBIA; LATINO; MSM; PREVALENCE; RESPONDENT-DRIVEN SAMPLING; SOCIAL SUPPORT

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Professor, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Winston-Salem, NC;, Email: srhodes@wakehealth.edu 2: Postdoctoral Fellow, Columbia University, HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York, NY 3: Research Associate, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Winston-Salem, NC 4: Postdoctoral Fellow, The University of Iowa, College of Public Health, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Iowa City, IA 5: Project Manager, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Winston-Salem, NC 6: Professor, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, Chapel Hill, NC 7: Executive Director, Alliance of AIDS Services-Carolina, Raleigh, NC 8: Health Scientist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Atlanta, GA 9: Adjunct Professor, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Winston-Salem, NC 10: Professor, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Departments of Biostatistical Sciences and Social Sciences and Health Policy, Winston-Salem, NC

Publication date: 2013-05-01

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