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Long-term Fruit and Vegetable Change in Worksites: Seattle 5 A Day Follow-up

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Objective : To evaluate long-term change in fruit and vegetable intake following a group randomized trial of worksites.

Methods : Medium-sized blue-collar businesses in the Seattle metropolitan area were recruited. Intake was assessed using serial cross-sectional samples of current workforce at 3 time points. The multilevel 18-month intervention involved partnership with the companies. Long-term follow-up was at 4.4 years postbaseline. Statistical analysis used general linear models, adjusting for worksite random effects.

Results : Initially, 45 worksites were randomized, with 29 agreeing to participate in a new study. Fruits and vegetable intake increased, with larger sustained changes in the intervention worksites, resulting in a long-term differential change of 0.25 servings per day, 95 confidence interval (0.09 to 0.40).

Conclusions : Intervention sustained small effects at 4 years, including 2 years with no contact. Although effects were not large, this low-intensity intervention approach could provide an important public health model.

Keywords: behavior change persistence; food; fruits and vegetables; intervention evaluation studies; long-term effects

Document Type: Research Article


Affiliations: 1 Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Publication date: November 1, 2010

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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