If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Seasonal shifts in competition and facilitation in subalpine plant communities of the central Caucasus

$28.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Buy Article:

Abstract:

Question: Temporal and spatial shifts in competitive and facilitative interactions among plants have important implications for species coexistence and community diversity. Many studies have focused on inter-seasonal variation in these interactions, but very few have examined short-term intra-seasonal shifts between competition and facilitation. In the central Caucasus Mountains the subalpine climate changes considerably over the season, with a relatively benign (humid and cooler) first part followed by a much more stressful (drier and warmer) second part. We ask: do plant interactions shift from competitive to facilitative during the growing season as environmental conditions change from mesic to dry?

Location: The central Caucasus Mountains, Georgia.

Methods: We experimentally investigated shifts in the balance of positive and negative interactions in plant communities over the course of a single growing season by conducting sequential removal experiments on two co-dominant species.

Results: We found that during the wet and cool first half of the growing season, target plants without neighbours accumulated significantly more biomass than individuals with neighbours, indicating competition. However, in the drier second half of the growing season competitive interactions were shifted to facilitation as individuals without neighbours accumulated significantly less biomass.

Conclusions: In general, these results support the view that competitive and facilitative effects exist in dynamic tension in plant communities with facilitation intensifying as abiotic stress increases, also within a growing season.

Keywords: ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS GRADIENT; NEIGHBOUR EFFECTS; PLANT-PLANT INTERACTIONS

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: February 1, 2006

More about this publication?
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more