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Open Access Mite-induced inflammation: More than allergy

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Clinical observations have suggested that there is an association of atopic conditions with hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This relationship has been especially present in patients allergic to mites. This study was designed to review clinical and experimental evidence linking atopy, mite allergy, and hypersensitivity to aspirin and NSAIDs and discuss the possible mechanisms explaining this association. A review of the medical literature concerning the association of atopic diseases, mite hypersensitivity, and intolerance to NSAIDs using PubMed and other relevant articles is presented. NSAID-sensitive patients are frequently atopic and allergic to mites, and patients who develop oral mite anaphylaxis (OMA) show an increased prevalence of NSAID hypersensitivity. The study of atopic, mite-sensitive patients, who experience urticaria and angioedema when exposed to NSAIDs and patients with OMA suggests an interesting interaction between atopic allergy and disorders of leukotriene synthesis or metabolism. Various mechanisms that could be involved in this interaction are presented, including genetic factors, inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, and other effects (not related to IgE sensitization) of mite constituents on the immune system. The association of mite hypersensitivity with aspirin/NSAIDs intolerance has been confirmed and provides additional clues to various nonallergic pathways that may contribute to the acute and chronic inflammatory process observed in atopic, mite-allergic, individuals. The clinical relevance of these observations is presently under investigation.

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Keywords: Aspirin; Dermatophagoides; NSAIDs; acetylsalicylic acid; angioedema; cysteinyl-leukotrienes; immunoglobulin E; leukotriene C4 synthase; mites; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: 2012-06-21

More about this publication?
  • In the fields of rhinology & allergy, as in all medical fields, there is a need for a greater number of journals which publish in the open access format. The underlying spirit of this format is to break down the barriers to knowledge sharing. Allergy & Rhinology, was created to serve this need; and is proud to take the lead in publishing quality research work as an experiment in the open format. As long as the fiscal model works, the Journal shall allow all users the right to freely read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of its articles.

    The academic standard of Allergy & Rhinology is designed to be no different than traditional subscription-based, scientific and scholarly journals in that the quality of the research work which it publishes shall meet the rigors of peer-review and other scholarly quality controls.

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