Role of specific IgE and skin-prick testing in predicting food challenge results to baked egg

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Abstract:

Previous studies suggest that children with egg allergy may be able to tolerate baked egg. Reliable predictors of a successful baked egg challenge are not well established. We examined egg white‐specific IgE levels, skin-prick test (SPT) results, and age as predictors of baked egg oral food challenge (OFC) outcomes. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children, aged 2‐18 years, receiving an egg white‐specific IgE level, SPT, and OFC to baked egg from 2008 to 2010. Fifty-two oral baked egg challenges were conducted. Of the 52 challenges, 83% (n = 43) passed and 17% (n = 9) failed, including 2 having anaphylaxis. Median SPT wheal size was 12 mm (range, 0‐35 mm) for passed challenges and 17 mm (range, 10‐30 mm) for failed challenges (p = 0.091). The negative predictive value for passing the OFC was 100% (9 of 9) if SPT wheal size was <10 mm. Median egg white‐specific IgE was 2.02 kU/L (range, <0.35‐13.00 kU/L) for passed challenges and 1.52 kU/L (range, 0.51‐6.10 kU/L) for failed challenges (p = 0.660). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for SPT revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.64. ROC curve analysis for egg white‐specific IgE revealed an AUC of 0.63. There was no significant difference in age between patients who failed and those who passed (median = 8.8 years versus 7.0 years; p = 0.721). Based on our sample, SPT, egg white‐specific IgE and age are not good predictors of passing a baked egg challenge. However, there was a trend for more predictability with SPT wheal size.
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  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. Its primary readership consists of allergists and pulmonologists.

    The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma.

    Featured topics include asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, food allergies, allergic skin diseases, diagnostic techniques, allergens, and treatment modalities. Published material includes peer-reviewed original research, clinical trials and review articles.

    Articles marked "F" offer free full text for personal noncommercial use only.

    The journal is indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Science Citation Index Expanded, plus the National Library of Medicine's PubMed service.
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