Skip to main content

Open Access Medical costs and adherence in patients receiving aqueous versus pressurized aerosol formulations of intranasal corticosteroids

Download Article:
 Download
(HTML 46.2 kb)
 
or
 Download
(PDF 317.7 kb)
 

Abstract:

Intranasal corticosteroid (INS) formulations have different sensory attributes that influence patient preferences, and thereby possibly adherence and health outcomes. This study compares health care use and costs and medication adherence in matched cohorts of patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) using a chlorofluorocarbon-propelled pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) or aqueous intranasal corticosteroid (A-INS). Florida Medicaid retrospective claims analysis was performed of enrollees aged ≥12 years with at least 1 year of continuous enrollment before their initial AR diagnosis, 1 year for continuous enrollment before their index INS claim, and 18 months of continuous enrollment after their index INS claim during which they received either pMDI or A-INS. pMDI and A-INS patients were matched 1:2 using propensity scores. Nonparametric analyses compared outcomes between matched cohorts at 6, 12, and 18 months of follow-up. A total of 585 patients were matched (pMDI = 195, A-INS = 390). pMDI patients were more adherent to INS, as reflected in their higher median medication possession ratio (53.2% versus 32.7%; p < 0.0001) and fewer median days between fills (73 days versus 111 days; p = 0.0003). Significantly lower median per patient pharmacy fills (34.0 versus 50.5; p < 0.05) and costs ($1282 versus $2178; p < 0.01) were observed among pMDI patients versus A-INS patients 18 months after INS initiation and were maintained when analyses excluded INS fills. Adherence to INS and health care utilization and costs following INS initiation for AR differed by type of formulation received. Our findings suggest patient preferences for INS sensory attributes can drive adherence and affect disease control, and ultimately impact health care costs.

Keywords: Adherence; Medicaid; allergic rhinitis; claims analysis; health care costs; health care utilization; intranasal corticosteroid; retrospective; sensory attributes

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2012.33.3565

Publication date: May 1, 2012

More about this publication?
  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. Its primary readership consists of allergists and pulmonologists.

    The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma.

    Featured topics include asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, food allergies, allergic skin diseases, diagnostic techniques, allergens, and treatment modalities. Published material includes peer-reviewed original research, clinical trials and review articles.

    Articles marked "F" offer free full text for personal noncommercial use only.

    The journal is indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Science Citation Index Expanded, plus the National Library of Medicine's PubMed service.
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Information for Advertisers
  • Reprint Requests
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
ocean/aap/2012/00000033/00000003/art00008
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more