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Comparison of the Asthma in America and Asthma Insight and Management surveys: Did asthma burden and care improve in the United States between 1998 and 2009?

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Abstract:

Significant changes in asthma treatment guidelines and therapies occurred between the period of time in which the Asthma in America (AIA) and Asthma Insight and Management (AIM) surveys were conducted: 1998 and 2009, respectively. This study compares asthma burden and management in 1998 and 2009. Both surveys were telephone based and conducted across the United States. The AIA survey included 2509 patients with asthma (aged <1 year to 89 years old), 512 physicians, and 1000 adults from the general population. The AIM survey included 2500 patients (aged ≥12 years), 309 physicians, and 1090 adults from the general population. Patient responses were weighted to match the entire population of U.S. patients with asthma. The impact of asthma burden and care on the general population and on asthma patients was slightly lower or unchanged in the AIM survey versus the AIA survey. Acute care use (hospitalizations, emergency department visits, or other urgent care visits) was common in AIA (36%) and AIM (34%) surveys. Most physicians were aware of guidelines in AIA (90%) and AIM (96%), but fewer “always” followed them (AIA, 36%; AIM, 28%). Spirometry was often used to aid in diagnosis by asthma care specialists (AIA, 73%; AIM, 76%) but infrequently by nonsubspecialists (AIA, 27%; AIM, 38%). Most physicians prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) for mild (AIA, 70%; AIM, 83%) or moderate (AIA, 89%; AIM, 83%) persistent asthma. In the AIM survey, 38% of specialists prescribed ICSs combined with a long-acting β2-agonist for moderate asthma. The state of U.S. asthma care and clinical outcomes changed little from 1998 to 2009.

Keywords: Adolescents; Asthma Insight and Management (AIM); Asthma in America; adults; asthma; control; guidelines; inhaled corticosteroids; management; survey

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2011.32.3521

Affiliations: Asthma and Allergy Associates, P.C., and Research Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA

Publication date: January 1, 2012

More about this publication?
  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. Its primary readership consists of allergists and pulmonologists.

    The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma.

    Featured topics include asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, food allergies, allergic skin diseases, diagnostic techniques, allergens, and treatment modalities. Published material includes peer-reviewed original research, clinical trials and review articles.

    Articles marked "F" offer free full text for personal noncommercial use only.

    The journal is indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Science Citation Index Expanded, plus the National Library of Medicine's PubMed service.
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