Predicting which medication classes interfere with allergy skin testing

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Abstract:

Medications often interfere with allergy skin test interpretation. This study was performed to determine which medications interfere with allergy skin tests. We retrospectively reviewed skin-prick test results from patients who had discontinued H1-antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), benzodiazepines, atypical antidepressants, antipsychotics, hypnotics, sedatives, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and H2-antagonists between 0 and 7 days before allergy skin testing. Ninety-seven subjects had taken second-generation H1-antihistamines within 7 days of skin testing; all patients who had stopped 3 days before testing had positive histamine controls. Two hundred sixty-eight skin tests performed on patients taking a single medication of interest showed that patients had the following percentages of a positive histamine control: TCAs, 56.5%; SNRIs, 100%; H2-blockers, 100%; SSRIs, 97%; PPIs, 97%; benzodiazepines, 85.7%; and atypical antidepressants/sedatives, 92.6%. The 580 patients taking multiple medications of interest showed that the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals of a negative histamine test for patients taking TCAs were 6.33 (2.11‐20.5), for H1-blockers were 4.95 (1.78‐15.1), for benzodiazepines were 5.01 (1.72‐15.80), for atypical antidepressants/sedatives were 3.11 (1.09‐9.61), and for H2-blockers were 2.91 (0.97‐9.37). The odds of a negative histamine test for SSRIs, SNRIs, or PPIs were not significantly increased. SSRIs, SNRIs, and PPIs are unlikely to interfere with skin testing. TCAs, H1-blockers, benzodiazepines, quetiapine, and mirtazapine should be discontinued temporarily if clinically able. H2-antagonists, bupropion, eszopiclone, trazodone, or zolpidem showed minimal interference with immediate hypersensitivity skin test histamine response.

Keywords: Agents; antidepressive hypnotics and sedatives; antipsychotic agents; benzodiazepines; histamine antagonists; histamine response; hypersensitivity; immediate; negative control; proton pump inhibitors; skin tests

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2010.31.3382

Affiliations: Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Publication date: November 1, 2010

More about this publication?
  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. Its primary readership consists of allergists and pulmonologists.

    The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma.

    Featured topics include asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, food allergies, allergic skin diseases, diagnostic techniques, allergens, and treatment modalities. Published material includes peer-reviewed original research, clinical trials and review articles.

    Articles marked "F" offer free full text for personal noncommercial use only.

    The journal is indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Science Citation Index Expanded, plus the National Library of Medicine's PubMed service.
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