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Does blood eosinophilia in wheezing infants predict later asthma? A prospective 18–20-year follow-up

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Abstract:

Although eosinophilia in wheezing infants predicts subsequent wheezing, it is not known how long the association persists. Our aim was to evaluate the connection between blood eosinophilia in infancy and later wheezing/asthma until adulthood, with special attention paid to infection-induced changes in blood eosinophils. We have prospectively followed up 83 infants until adulthood after hospitalization for bronchiolitis in 1981–1982. Blood eosinophils were determined in a counting chamber on admission and on convalescence 4–6 weeks later. Data on recurrent wheezing and asthma were registered prospectively at five follow-ups until the age of 18–20 years. The median (25th–75th percentile) eosinophil count was 0.100 × 10E9/L (0.028–0.321) on admission and 0.231 × 10E9/L (0.119–0.368) on convalescence. Eosinophils during bronchiolitis or infection-induced changes in eosinophils were not associated with subsequent wheezing/asthma at any age during the follow-up. The result was similar in univariate and multivariate analyses. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis patients had lower eosinophils on admission than non-RSV cases, but the changes induced by RSV or other infection did not differ significantly. In univariate analyses, elevated eosinophils on convalescence predicted later wheezing until 3–4 years of age. In multivariate analysis, adjusted for RSV etiology, age on admission, and histories of earlier wheezing and atopy, elevated eosinophils on convalescence predicted increased asthma risk at 2–3 years (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.29–3.95), at 3–4 years (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.27–3.95), and at 8.5–10 years (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.01–4.64). Eosinophilia outside, but not during, infection predicted recurrent wheezing until preschool and early school years but not thereafter.

Keywords: ADULTHOOD; ASTHMA; BRONCHIOLITIS; EOSINOPHILS; INFANCY; LONG-TERM FOLLOWUP; RISK FACTOR

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.2500/app.2007.28.2946

Affiliations: Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland

Publication date: 2007-03-01

More about this publication?
  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. Its primary readership consists of allergists and pulmonologists.

    The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma.

    Featured topics include asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, food allergies, allergic skin diseases, diagnostic techniques, allergens, and treatment modalities. Published material includes peer-reviewed original research, clinical trials and review articles.

    Articles marked "F" offer free full text for personal noncommercial use only.

    The journal is indexed in Thomson Reuters Web of Science and Science Citation Index Expanded, plus the National Library of Medicine's PubMed service.
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